admin, Author at Bariatric Food Expert - Page 2 of 7

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February 1, 2019by admin0
 
How can we be sure that we are getting enough vitamin D in winter?  
 
Vitamin D is fat soluble and it is a super interesting nutrient.  We can only get it in a few of our foods so which foods are those?  
 
You will find vitamin D in red meat, some of the oily fish and it is also added to dairy products.  The cool part about our bodies is that we are able to create our own vitamin D by having direct sun shine on our skin.  
 
 
A lot of us are able to get sufficient vitamin D when eating a healthy diet and spending some time outside in summer and also in spring and early fall.  For a lot of us, we need to be careful because it is possible to suffer from deficiencies of vitamin D.  Not all of us are able to be outside due to severe winter temperatures. 
 
If we become deficient in vitamin D, there can be health issues and consequences.  We need vitamin D for healthy muscles, bones, and teeth and this nutrient is responsible for regulating the quantity of calcium and phosphate we have in our bodies.  We require vitamin D for for a strong immune system and proper cellular growth.  
 
When we are lacking in vitamin D, several health problems can occur such as: 
hair loss, bone and muscle pain and slow wound healing.
 
Very low levels of vitamin D are also linked to season affective disorder which is an intense form of “the winter blues”.  
 
How can we ensure that we get sufficient vitamin D in the winter?  
 
We are able to build up our vitamin D stores during the spring, summer and early fall by spending time outside and allowing the sun to hit our skin and work its magic.  If you cannot be outside, you will need to try to add vitamin D rich food to your diet.  It will also be recommended that you take a supplement for vitamin D.  
 
It is important to note that the sun’s UVB rays are unable to penetrate through windows so those of us who work next to sunny windows are still prone to vitamin D deficiency.
 
How can you tell if you have low levels of vitamin D?
You can get a simple blood test to check and see how much vitamin D is stored in your body.  A trip to your family doctor can tell you if you require supplementation for this important nutrient.  

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.


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January 24, 2019by admin0
I really like this topic because we need to be realistic and I am all about moderation – even when it comes to eating out.  I am not all about moderation when it comes to adding a bit of refined carbs to my diet. I personally like to try my best to keep them out of my diet but I still want to eat out occasionally.
 
Let’s discuss some good ways to maneuver at restaurants when adopting a ketogenic lifestyle and limiting refined and processed carbohydrates.
 
First of all, I never think it to be a good idea to be starving when entering a restaurant but if you are eating in a ketogenic fashion, then you won’t ever feel like you are starving.  I keep some nuts and seeds in my car and if I feel like I have gone too long between meals, I will snack on those.  
 
I like to try to choose restaurants that source local ingredients and ones that have fresh options on the menu.  I also like to always have a look at the menu online of the restaurant which I will be visiting in order to plan my meal prior to arriving.  That way I already know what I am going to order in advance.  
 
Almost all restaurants are going to have a meat or fish dish on the menu.  You can order this option and then add a side salad or grilled vegetables instead of opting for the carb-heavy side such as french fries or mashed potatoes.
 
Why not order the hamburger without the bun.  You can ask for a lettuce bun and a side  salad instead of fries.
 
If you have a  love of Mexican food you could order some fajitas with no tortillas and a side order of guacamole at most Mexican restaurants.
 
There are many ways to maneuver when eating out at restaurants but in the beginning you will need to source out the best ones to help you maintain your new life-style.  
 
Find our bariatric ketogenic plan at this link: KETO PLAN
 

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.


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January 17, 2019by admin0
Keto Food Pyramid

Are you questioning what you should be eating and what you shouldn’t be eating when following a ketogenic lifestyle?
 
We all have a good idea of what the regular Standard American Diet Food Pyramid looks like.  At the top you will find fats, oils and sugar.  Down below comes your dairy products and your meat products with eggs add dry beans next to it.  Below that comes your vegetables and fruits and at the bottom – with the biggest section is bread, cereal, rice and pasta.  
 
This food model wants you to eat 6 to 11 portions of refined carbohydrates each and every day.
 
This food pyramid is built on unhealthy carbs that digest quickly and raise our blood sugars quickly.
 
Today things are changing and if you want to grab the reins and follow a ketogenic lifestyle, you are going to flip that Standard American Diet on its head.  You are going to get government out of your food choices and you are going to eat intuitively in order to improve your health.  
 
At the top of your pyramid will be the biggest section which contains healthy fats and oils, under that is lean meat, fish and eggs, followed by non-starchy vegetables, followed by vegetables low in carbs, and at the very bottom you will find nuts and berries.  
 
Notice how different the two models look.
Now is the time to take control of your health and to remove the foods out of you diet which create inflammation and prevent you from losing weight.
 
Eating ketogenic is eating a very low “refined and processed” carbohydrate load.  My clients who follow a ketogenic lifestyle create a plate which contains a portion of protein, two low carb veggies and a serving of heathy fat.  
 
Eating this way stabilizes blood sugar and leaves us feeling satisfied for longer periods of time.  We eat better, feel better, lower inflammation and lose weight.
 
This is how you should feed your body.  You have a super powerful machine and it will respond when you feed it correctly.  Love yourself enough to give it a try and eat sensibly and responsibly.  Get the “frankenfoods” out of your diet.  Eat real, live, natural and good quality food.  Your body will thank you.
 
If you need help planning a bariatric ketogenic life-style, we have you covered.  Find our bariatric ketogenic plan at this link:
 

I support you in your journey to your best health ever!

 

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.


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January 8, 2019by admin0

What is the best way to break an intermittent fast.

Intermittent Fasting (IF) is getting more and more popular today. I wanted to take some time out of my day to bring you some important information for those who have adopted IF into their bariatric lifestyles.

Remember, we are biochemical individuals and one specific lifestyle will not be the correct lifestyle for everyone.  You need to try different things and see what works best for you.  Intermittent Fasting is not for everyone.

If you want to learn more about intermittent fasting for bariatric clients, please visit the following link:  https://international-patient-facilitators.com/intermittent-fasting-after-weight-loss-surgery-bariatric-edition/

If we are constantly “feeding” we are also constantly prepping and thinking about food.  It is liberating to remove 16 hours of my day from thinking about food.  I am able to better focus on other things.  

I am a big fan of the Intermittent Fast and I also use it as a part of my healthy lifestyle. For me it signifies simplicity and balance and it enables me to spend less time thinking about food and more time to work, exercise, write and be with my family.  

Let’s discuss a 16/8 Intermittent Fast which means your fasting window will be 16 hours and your feeding window will be 8 hours long. 

While fasting you can drink unlimited amounts of water, flavored waters (no sugar added), teas and coffee.

Eating begins at the “eating window” you have chosen – for example noon, and ends at 8pm.  Starting at 8pm you will go back to drinking liquids until noon the next day.

When we do break our fasts, we want to be sure to choose super high quality, food and we want to think about our macronutrients and what is going to be best for us in a post fasting state.

I am going to share with you some of the best ways to break your fast and what sort of lunches or meals you can prepare to get the very best results when choosing to use Intermittent Fasting in your bariatric lifestyle.

If you have already been following a ketogenic diet, it will be much easier for you while fasting.  Those people who have a diet higher in carbohydrates will also have great results with IF but it will be a bit more difficult to fast as their blood sugars will not be as stable and this creates more hunger and anxiety.

If you would like to experiment with Intermittent Fasting, I suggest that you follow a very low carb diet or a ketogenic diet.  This will make fasting much more enjoyable.

If you want more information regarding a ketogenic lifestyle, you can visit this link:

When you break your fast, it is recommend to have a small glass of water with a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar or lemon in your water.  This will help to increase the hydrochloric acid (HCI) in your stomach and improve your digestion.

I like to break my fast with a ketogenic meal and below are a few good options and suggestions sticking to low carb, moderate fat and protein.

A few of my favorites are:

  • Eggs cooked in butter with spinach and mushrooms.
  • Chicken Cesar Salad
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup with a bit of avocado
  • Baked Salmon and Cauliflower Puree
  • Cream of Broccoli soup sprinkled with cheese and seeds. 

As you can see, the above mentioned meals have no refined or processed carbohydrates.  They have a serving of protein, vegetables and healthy fat. This is the best way to break your 16 hour fast and remain in ketosis. 

Reach out to me if you have any questions regarding intermittent fasting as a bariatric patient or if you have questions regarding ketosis.

I support you in your journey to your best health ever!

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.


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December 19, 2018by admin0

What are some of the best choices we can make as bariatric patients?  How do we know what to eat?  Who do we listen to?  Which is the next best diet that we need to be following?

How did all of this get so confusing?  There is so much information and one thing contradicts the next.  One person says to eat more protein and the next person says to go vegan. Sure, they can both work but you need to also find out what works for you as a biochemical individual.  What works for you doesn’t necessarily work for everybody.   

I want to make things simple and to give you a realistic nutritional plan that you can follow each and every day.  That’s what I strive for.  I strive to bring good nutritional advice to you and to educate you about the things we all should do to stay healthy, lose weight, maintain our goals and how to reach our best health yet.

What about “diets” ?  Is there a specific diet we should be following as post op bariatric patients?  After the initial post surgery phase of liquids and purees and soft foods, once we are past that – our diet should look like real food.  We should be eating plenty of vegetables and berries, nuts and seeds, protein and healthy fats.  We should be eating whole, fresh, live, good quality, real food. 

If it comes in a package, put it down and find the fresher version.  Shop on the outside of the grocery store.  Read labels.  Stay away from sugar.  Stay away from processed foods.  Become a BOSS in the kitchen.  Purchase your groceries and then take the time to do a food preparation.  Make your meals simple.  Add a serving of protein and two vegetables with a healthy portion of fat.  Plan a few days in advance.

Forget diet “labels” – Paleo this and Vegan that – treat yourself to real food and you won’t need to worry about dieting.  Sure, I am a fan of the ketogenic lifestyle and I love a good detox but if you look at what foods are on these “diets”, you will see that they contain “whole foods”.  They are not filled with canned food or boxed food or frozen meals.  

2019 is the time to take your nutritional needs seriously and to work at cleaning up your diet so that you can feel better, increase your energy levels and stabilize your blood sugars.  Let’s move towards a simple, clean diet of real, whole foods and let’s make our kitchens a place where we get serious about our health.  This is the year of the “un”diet and the movement this year will see us healthy, and happy and glowing with energy and stamina.

We’ve got this.

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.


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December 13, 2018by admin0

What does it take to be a bariatric success?  As an RHN who specializes in bariatric nutrition, I have heard this question many times over and I wish I had the exact right answer for you.  There is not a “one size fits all” way to respond to this query.  It is more about the journey and learning about yourself and what works for you.  It is about making important changes to ensure success and not just doing the same thing you were doing before surgery.  The surgery is the tool but we need to learn as much as we can about how use this important tool to achieve our short and long term goals.

What I do know for sure is that we all need to find what works for us as biochemical individuals after weight loss surgery.  This is where you need to discover what this very personal journey is for you and means to.  What works for you?  Does drinking protein shakes for breakfast with added avocado keep you full and satisfied until lunch?  Does taking a walk after dinner curb the cravings to eat something sweet?  Does going to bed earlier help to keep the nighttime munchies at bay? 

You will experience good times and bad times along the way. These are the ups and downs of bariatric surgery.  During the bad times, you need to get up, dust yourself off and just keep on moving forward.  You need to make a commitment to yourself and also to your health.  Set goals for yourself.  Make long term and short term goals.  Reach for those goals each and every day.

Support during this journey is key to short and long term success.  If you can find an at-home group or an online group, please do so and stick close to them.  They are a valuable part of your journey and they will help to keep you on track and to keep you accountable.  

Write everything down.  Keep a food log and a journal and jot down everything you eat and drink. Make it a habit to write down your feelings and your plans as the days go by.  Writing things down make you accountable to yourself.  This is a way to stay on track even when it get tough and you feel yourself slipping.  Taking a moment to write things down enable you to better understand yourself.

What does food mean to you?  I think that a very important change that needs to be made to ensure success post surgery is the way we think about food.  It is important to learn about proper nutrition and not just do the same things we were doing prior to surgery but on a smaller scale post surgery.  Why should we stay away from refined carbohydrates and what is a refined carbohydrate?  These are the things we should be learning early on in order to understand and think differently regarding food.  

Congratulations  – for taking your own health into your own hands.

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.


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December 7, 2018by admin0

Bariatric surgery is like a “new beginning” or a “fresh start” and it is a super exciting but also a super stressful experience for those going through it.  Patients spend a lot of time prepping for surgery and they have maybe even spent years researching their procedure. Bariatric surgery is a life-changing journey and can have some amazing long term effects on a person’s life.

I totally understand how patients can feel once they hit their first weight loss plateau.  That’s the place where the scale stops moving.  That’s the place where no matter what they do, and no matter how perfect they are following the bariatric rules, the scale will not budge.  

Why does this happen?  The patients are not doing anything wrong so why does the scale plateau approximately 3 weeks after surgery?  

Prior to surgery our patients need to follow a pre.op diet.  This is to shrink the liver and make the surgery safer for them.  The pre.op diet varies from surgeon to surgeon but in general they all follow some sort of rules such as: only liquids or low in carbs or high in protein or low in calories.  

It is perfect to have a tiny shrunken liver prior to surgery but in general, the body does not want to maintain this small liver.  It wants the liver to go back to the regular size.  Our livers are so important, and have so many functions so the body wants to get the liver back to its regular size post surgery. How long does this take ?? You are right – it takes approximately 3 weeks.

Sometimes this plateau occurs a little bit before or a little bit after the 3 week mark and sometimes it lasts a few days or a few weeks. What’s important during this plateau is to continue following all of your post op guidelines.  

It takes time to lose all the weight after any bariatric procedure.  Try to stay focused on a slow and steady weight loss.  In the beginning it comes off quickly and then it tends to slow down.  When this happens, try to do the following:

Don’t step on the scale 3 times a day.  Check your weight about two times a week.  When the scale is not in use, hide it in your closet to be sure you are not constantly stepping on it.

Put your focus on super clean eating and learning about food and what is good for you to consume post surgery and why that food is good for you.  These new eating habits are what will ensure success, short and long term.  Be kind to your new tummy and enjoy your new healthy lifestyle.

When you look at your weight loss, it will look more like a set of stairs… drop, plateau, drop, plateau.  You are going to lose weight on some days and on other days you will plateau.  This is a normal part of the weight loss journey post bariatric surgery.

When you do hit that 3 week plateau, don’t fret.  Take this like a regular part of your bariatric journey.  Don’t be hard on yourself.  Be proud of yourself.  Enjoy your journey to health and wellness.

 

If you have specific questions, please reach out directly to me.  I salute you on your journey to health and wellness. info@bariatricfoodexpert.com 

Congratulations  – for taking your own health into your own hands.

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.

 

 


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November 22, 2018by admin0

Let’s dive into some very important information.  If you have had bariatric surgery, there is a chance that you could have a vitamin D deficiency following the surgery.  Even before surgery, a lot of us experience the effects of a vitamin D deficiency.  There are over 3 million cases each year in the US alone.  

Once someone has had their intestinal tract shortened or changed, the chances of developing a vitamin deficiency becomes even higher than for just an average person.  Vitamin D builds strong bones and this is why it is so important.  With a lack of vitamin D, the body had difficulties to use calcium in an efficient manner.  Most of the time, no symptoms are demonstrated and this makes the risk even more serious.  Down the road problems can develop such as chronic joint pain, continuous fatigue, fractures, bone loss and even depression.  

If you have had any sort of bariatric surgery, please get your doctor to take measurements of your vitamin D levels and stores.  You need to know if you need a supplement or not.  I always suggest to try to prevent any types of deficiencies before they develop instead of trying to fix it after you’ve started having uncomfortable symptoms.  It can take months.  Make an investment in your heath before troubles begin and take a regular specialized Vitamin D3 supplement from the Experts – the Bariatric Experts.

Bariatric Expert are super high quality products developed by bariatric professionals and geared to help you continue on your super healthy journey post bariatric surgery.

If you have specific questions, please reach out directly to me.  I salute you on your journey to health and wellness. info@bariatricfoodexpert.com 

Congratulations  – for taking your own health into your own hands.

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.

 

 


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October 30, 2018by admin0

I can say that it is a balancing act when trying to lose weight.  You want to eat the right foods, that give you the correct nutrients, to have the energy to exercise – which will in turn make you feel more motivated because you release happy chemicals like endorphins.  Poor nutrient lacking diets and over-exercising is just not something that can be sustained.  These types of routines keep you feeling demotivated and tired and lacking in energy.  

I want to shout it from the rooftops “weight loss is a lifelong journey – it’s not the 100 yard dash.  Let’s take small sustainable steps instead of going full steam ahead and running out of energy in a week or two.  

A healthy diet is so important to long term weight loss success.  If we choose to rely on only exercise to lower the numbers on the scale, we will be setting ourselves up for disappointment and unfulfilled goals.  When it comes to losing weight and controlling our weight, exercise is only a small part of the equation.  The quantity of calories we burn up each day is not about how much we move around.  It is mostly up to the basal metabolic rate.  This BMR makes up about 80% of the energy that we use on a daily basis.  That means that only 20% of the calories we burn or the energy that we use comes down to the exercise that we do.

This is exactly what is meant by that old saying “you cannot outrun a bad diet”.  We cannot purely rely on exercise and we need to focus on nutrition.  Of course we need to exercise for our overall health.  The best we can do is to combine an improvement in diet with exercise.  This is the balancing act that we need to try to perform each day.  

Focus on making long lasting improvements in your diet, which will in turn give you the energy to exercise, which in turn will help you lose weight and improve your health.  

If you have specific questions, please reach out directly to me.  I salute you on your journey to health and wellness. info@bariatricfoodexpert.com 

Congratulations  – for taking your own health into your own hands.

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.

 

 


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October 22, 2018by admin0

Why don’t we ever crave a plate of chicken and cauliflower and why do we crave salt, sugar and fat? Here are a few reasons why we want that piece of chocolate cake/ push over broccoli. 

Why is it that there are periods in our life where we are cruising along happily consuming our salads and grilled chicken and other times where we cannot convince ourselves that the french fries and burger we are about to consume are less about hunger and more about cravings ?

There are a couple of different things working against us when we have specific cravings.  There is the emotion side of things – for example “My Monday Sucks” and then there is a physiological factor – for example “The chocolate actually makes me feel good after I eat it”.  

What’s going on ? and how can we get back on track after experiencing a few weeks of disorganized eating ?  Those cravings you are having are not always your fault and sometimes they happen because we are experiencing a lack in specific nutrients and vitamins.  Those same nutrients and vitamins can actually regulate how you are feeling and why you are eating.

Why don’t we ever crave a plate of chicken and cauliflower and why do we crave salt, sugar and fat? Our bodies don’t need a bag of gummy bears but we tend to not listen to what it really needs.  Did you know that when you eat sugar, your body uses magnesium molecules to assimilate it?  If you are eating tons of sugar, it could mean that you are lacking magnesium.  This is a perfect example of what a sugar craving “could mean”.  

When a food craving strikes next time, sit down and really think about what you actually need.  Do you feel stressed and crave cake ?  Is it the emotional stress that is leading you to crave the cake?  If you reflect like this, you can better understand when is happening with your body and in turn help to control those cravings, giving your body what is actually needs and not just giving into a craving.

Here are some examples to think about.

MAGNESIUM – there are a lot of us that are deficient in magnesium.  More than 80% of us are walking around with too little magnesium.  When we are stressed or exercising a lot or eating a lot of sugar, we can deplete our magnesium levels.  Magnesium works together with calcium. Calcium is an excitatory molecule and magnesium is its counterpart behaving as a calming molecule. If we are not balanced between these two minerals, it can lead us to feel moody.  

If you have cravings for sweets and if you have aches and pains or low energy, you might just need some additional magnesium.  Eat sesame seeds, almonds, avocados, spinach, kale and broccoli.

ZINC – Zinc is the mineral required for many bodily reactions.  It also works to maintain mood and memory.  Zinc is so important yet we cannot store it in our body so we need to focus on getting those foods which are high in zinc on a regular basis.  When we are feeling stressed, zinc is eliminated through our saliva, sweat and urine.  Low zinc levels can be linked to depression.

If you have gastrointestinal issues, sadness or very bad PMS, try adding zinc to your diet through eating foods such as: salmon, almonds, pumpkin seeds, oysters, shellfish.

VITAMIN B12 – 25% of Americans and Canadians are low in B12.  B12 is linked to energy levels, mood levels and memory levels.  We need to have a strong stomach acid to be able to break down and assimilate B12.  This may be the reason why so many people are deficient in Vitamin B12.  You can only get B12 by eating animal proteins.  This is why vegetarians are vegans need to supplement to get sufficient B12 in their diets.

If you find yourself bruising easily or craving a steak or if you have low energy, you may be one of the 25% of us who require higher levels of vitamin B12.  If this sounds like you, eat more pasture raised chicken, turkey and eggs and organic grass fed meat.

VITAMIN D – We all think of the sun when we think of Vitamin D.  Vitamin D is the “sun vitamin”. When we expose our skin to the sun, Vitamin D is activated and produces elements that make us feel happier.  People with low Vitamin D stores are more likely to feel depressed.  

If you are catching more colds or sore throats than normal, or if you are in a low mood, you may have your Vitamins D levels low.  To increase vitamin D, eat fatty fish like mackerel and salmon, and eat eggs – whole eggs, because the Vitamin D is in the egg yolks. Also, remember to get outdoors and expose your skin to the sun for 10 to 15 minutes.  This also helps to raise Vitamin D levels.

We can dive even deeper into this topic as there are many other nutrient deficiencies – if you have specific questions, please reach out directly to me with your questions: 

info@bariatricfoodexpert.com 

I salute all of you – for taking your own health into your own hands.

About the Author: Sheri Burke is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and Bariatric Surgery Coordinator at International Patient Facilitators in Tijuana and Cancun, Mexico. She has worked with bariatric surgery clients for over 10 years and especially enjoys providing nutritional guidance to pre and post bariatric clients.  In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and two teens and cooking up a nutritional storm in the kitchen.

Eat Like a Bariatric Expert with our Nutrition Plans.

Feel free to share your victories and struggles in our Facebook Group. I would love to connect with you.